Biologists rescue two snakes in two days and warn about species on the coast of SP

Earlier this week, biologists Thiago Malpighi and Ligia Amorim, both from the Department of Environment and Agriculture of Peruíbe, on the coast of São Paulo, rescued two more snakes in urban areas.

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Now, in the updated bulletin of the Secretariat, 28 snake rescues were carried out, seven of which are venomous, of public health interest. In total, there were 86 rescues of fauna in the municipality, in the last seven months.

On Monday (4), a snake of the species Helicops carinicaudus (water snake), was rescued from a property on Avenida Mário Covas, central region. In a note sent to North Coast PortalThiago says that it is common to see this species in urban areas, including the sandy strip of the beach.

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Serpent of the species Helicops carinicaudus (water snake) was rescued from a property (Reproduction Thiago Malpighi)

“These are snakes associated with water, which can appear near the rainwater drainage channels that exist in the city. It is not a species of health importance, that is, it does not produce venom and is not involved in snakebites that are important from a clinical and epidemiological perspective,” said the biologist.

The next day (5th), the biologist received another call from residents to carry out a new snake rescue, this time a Dipsas neuwiedipopularly known as a sleeper.

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Dipsas neuwiedi, popularly known as opium poppy. This is an animal often confused with pit vipers (Reproduction Thiago Malpighi)

“It is an animal often confused with pit vipers. It is quite common to find them in urban areas, curled up during the day. The specimen in question was rescued from a property close to the border between Itanhaém and Peruíbe”, explained the biologist to the report.

venomous snakes

In Peruíbe there are about 27 species of snakes, of which only three are of public health interest, that is, they may be involved in accidents with clinical and epidemiological relevance: Micrurus corallinus (true coral), Bothrops jararacuçu (jararacuçu) and Bothrops pit viper (jararaca).

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Also according to Thiago, the genus Micrurus, despite being known for its neurotoxicity, is involved in less than 1% of snakebites reported in Brazil. and anatomy that minimize the chances of accidents, but still require care.

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Rescue

The snake biologist emphasizes that unfortunately killing snakes is a common practice in the country, people try to justify it with a variety of arguments and in most cases ignorance is the origin of fear and killing them is not the way.

“In Peruíbe, the argument we see the most is associated with the supposed risk/danger. However, almost every time we check the dead specimen, it is a species that is not of public health importance. In this context, the argument in question makes no sense and demonstrates that ignorance is the origin of fear and conduct,” he said.

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Thiago also says that most snakes are not venomous, most accidents do not lead to death, and most encounters in the municipality are not with snakes of public health importance.

“In the case of venomous snakes, rescue activities aim not only to ensure the well-being and protection of wild animals, but also to manage the risks associated with the possibility of snakebite accidents. In this context, we always take the opportunity to talk to applicants and pass on important information on the subject. The importance of triggering the rescue is, therefore, linked to the protection of the animal and the human population”, he emphasizes.

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What to do when you see a snake

Just keep calm, keep your distance and each go their own way. If this is not possible, or if the animal is not in the natural environment, contact the competent institutions or professionals qualified to deal with these animals.

The biologist’s recommendation is: found the animal, venomous or not, DO NOT KILL, send a photo/message, the species will be identified, the person will obtain the necessary guidelines and the animal will be rescued, whenever possible.

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Environmental Police by phone (12) 3842-0123 on the North Coast or by phone; (13) 3348-4774 and (13) 3853-5750 for those in Baixada Santista or Vale do Ribeira. Identification is not required.

In Peruíbe, information can be obtained from the Environment Department (13) 3451-1066 or (13) 99679-9631 (biologist Thiago Malpighi).

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