Threatened with extinction, puma is captured in a farm in Presidente Epitacio and returned to the wild | President Prudente and Region

Teams from the Fire Department and the Environmental Military Police captured this Monday (20) a puma that had appeared at a farm in the Alto Mirante neighborhood in the urban area of ​​Presidente Epitácio (SP).

The animal, which belongs to an endangered species, needed to be sedated and, after undergoing a veterinary medical evaluation, was released in a stretch of the Rio do Peixe State Park between Ouro Verde (SP) and Presidente Venceslau (SP) .

According to the Environmental Police, the estimate is that the female is around a year and a half old.

Also known as cougar, puma, red jaguar and bay lion, the puma (Puma concolor) is the second largest species of feline in Brazil, only behind the jaguar (panthera onca). It has an elongated body, up to 1.08 meters long. The long tail measures up to 61 centimeters and the height is 63 centimeters.

The adult male can weigh around 70 kilos. The cougar’s coat is uniform in color, ranging from very light gray-brown to dark reddish-brown.

Generally, animals that live in forests are smaller and darker and those that inhabit mountainous regions are larger and lighter.

They have nocturnal (predominantly) and diurnal habits, hunting at any time of the day with a certain tendency towards twilight.

Although it is a terrestrial species, it has great ability to climb trees and is very agile. The cougar lives alone, except during the mating season.

Research has proven that the cougar is the most efficient and most flexible predator among felines. She gets food 75% of the time she goes on the attack.

The diet ranges from small rodents to large mammals (capybaras, deer and collared peccaries), birds and reptiles.

The gestation period varies between 84 and 98 days, and one to six pups are born, each weighing 220 to 440 grams.

The species is considered vulnerable and endangered.

Puma was captured in Presidente Epitácio (SP) this Monday (20) — Photo: Environmental Military Police

According to the biologist André Gonçalves Vieira, responsible for several fauna surveys in Presidente Prudente (SP), the puma is not in the habit of attacking people, unless it feels cornered, with cubs or feeding extrafragility.

“Unfortunately, with the loss of its natural habitat (native plant cover) and, consequently, the fall of prey (food), this animal is increasingly being observed near urban areas”, Vieira pointed out.

“One of the greatest threats to the survival of wild cats around the world is the loss of habitats due to urban expansion, the agricultural matrix, retaliation for predation of domestic animals and roadkill. Therefore, it is always important to obey the speed limits of the roads and keep an eye out”, pointed out to g1 biologist Rondinelle Artur Simões Salomão, professor at the Universidade do Oeste Paulista (Unoeste), in Presidente Prudente.

Salomão also advised that, when seeing a wild animal on the roads, it is important to keep a considerable distance and not try to scare it away.

“These animals pose no direct risk to humans and, if left undisturbed, will go on their way. Pumas only defend themselves in cases where they are cornered or are protecting their young,” she pointed out.

Puma was captured in Presidente Epitácio (SP) this Monday (20) — Photo: Environmental Military Police

Puma was captured in Presidente Epitácio (SP) this Monday (20) — Photo: Environmental Military Police

Puma was captured in Presidente Epitácio (SP) this Monday (20) — Photo: Environmental Military Police

Puma was taken to the Rio do Peixe State Park — Photo: Environmental Military Police

Felino was released in Rio do Peixe State Park — Photo: Military Highway Police

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